Gas prices prompting Cincinnati workers to look for ways to ease pump pain

In a move that mirrors the name of his business, Jeff Niceley recently expanded a benefit that can help workers like Marcus Starks save serious cash.”Usually our licensed techs take vehicles home,” Niceley, who runs Niceley’s Heating, Cooling, Appliance Repair in Erlanger. “Our apprentices do not. But now we’re getting our apprentices to take them; basically, anybody that is having trouble with fuel prices, take a company vehicle home.””It’s extremely beneficial,” Starks said.After driving a company van during the day — to help homeowners with their HVAC needs — Starks can now stay in the driver’s seat and take that same vehicle home. He said it’s a nice option to consider what it takes to fill up his Jeep SUV.”It’s doubled,” Starks said. “So when I first got the vehicle (the Jeep), I would only spend maybe 40 bucks to fill it up. Now I’m at, like, 75.”Niceley’s isn’t the only local company helping workers contend with gas prices that keep climbing.”Luckily, where I’m at, you know, we have good flexibility where if we need to work from home we have that option,” Alexis Woolard said.Woolard is employed by a Cincinnati-based company working to help solve the gas price crisis.”At Electrada, we are an electric vehicle infrastructure solutions company,” she said.On the home front, Woolard and her husband are cutting back on their personal travel.’We really have to be, you know, cognizant of how many trips we’re making,” she saidBut in her professional role, Woolard wants to make high gas prices a relic.”Our primary goal (at Electrada) is just exactly, like, how can we help accelerate adoption for folks who are looking to be all-electric — from an perspective economics because of where fuel prices are going (and) from the env ironmental perspective?”With gas prices now averaging more than $5 in Cincinnati, some traditional car enthusiasts may be thinking about going all-electric.Woolard said more EV models, from a growing number of manufacturers, should start hitting the market next year, with prices more in line with what a gasoline-powered car costs.

In a move that mirrors the name of his business, Jeff Niceley recently expanded a benefit that can help workers like Marcus Starks save serious cash.

“Usually our licensed techs take vehicles home,” said Niceley, who runs Niceley’s Heating, Cooling, Appliance Repair in Erlanger. “Our apprentices do not. But now we’re getting our apprentices to take them; basically, anybody that is having trouble with fuel prices, take a company vehicle home.”

“It’s extremely beneficial,” Starks said.

After driving a company van during the day — to help homeowners with their HVAC needs — Stark can now stay in the driver’s seat and take that same vehicle home. He said it’s a nice option to consider what it takes to fill up his Jeep SUV.

“It’s doubled,” Starks said. “So when I first got the vehicle (the Jeep), I would only spend maybe 40 bucks to fill it up. Now I’m at, like, 75.”

Niceley’s isn’t the only local company helping workers contend with gas prices that keep climbing.

“Luckily, where I’m at, you know, we have good flexibility where if we need to work from home we have that option,” said Alexis Woolard.

Woolard is employed by a Cincinnati-based company working to help solve the gas price crisis.

“At Electrada, we are an electric vehicle infrastructure solutions company,” she said.

On the home front, Woolard and her husband are cutting back on their personal travel.

‘We really have to be, you know, cognizant of how many trips we’re making,” she said

But in her professional role, Woolard wants to make high gas prices a relic.

“Our primary goal (at Electrada) is just exactly, like, how can we help accelerate adoption for folks who are looking to be all-electric — from an economic perspective because of where fuel prices are going (and) from the environmental perspective? “

With gas prices now averaging more than $5 in Cincinnati, some traditional car enthusiasts may be thinking about going all-electric.

Woolard said more EV models, from a growing number of manufacturers, should start hitting the market next year, with prices more in line with what a gasoline-powered car costs.

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